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Four Scriptural Reasons for Affirming the Inauguration of the Davidic Covenant at the Ascension of the Lord Jesus Christ:

1.  In His post-resurrection pronouncements to the Apostles the Lord Jesus Christ proclaimed that “All power is given unto me in heaven and in earth” (Mt. 28:18).  The Davidic reign must not be excluded from this grant and assumption due to its universal and eternal nature implicit in the language of the “commission” it introduces.

2.  Peter directly connects the resurrection and ascension of the Lord Jesus Christ to David’s prophetic pronouncement concerning the enthronement of the Davidic Messiah (Acts 2:25-36).  Specifically, the antecedent of the pronoun “his” modifying “throne” (Acts 2:30) is the same as that of “him”, and “his” (“loins”) earlier in the verse, and “he” in the beginning of the next verse (Acts 2:31), i.e. “the patriarch David” (Acts 2:29).  In particular, the term “his throne” at the end of the verse should be seen as coordinate with “his loins” in the middle of the verse, and therefore, of necessity, as having the identical antecedent, i.e., David.  In other words, the throne in view is referred to as David’s throne, and the enthronement of Jesus as the universal Lord and Messiah in His ascension (Acts 2:34-36) is explicitly connected to the throne of David and the fulfillment of what was revealed to David centuries before.

3.  When Christ returns to assert His absolute reign on the earth He will already be vested with the titles: “King of kings and Lord of lords” (Rev. 19:16).  This is consistent with His assertion in Mt. 28:18, and once again, must of necessity be seen as inclusive of the Davidic reign, as well as all others without exception.

4.  All of the above is consistent with and flows directly from the recognition of who He already was at His birth, i.e., the King of the Jews (Mt. 2:1-6; Lk. 1:32-33).  This was also explicitly acknowledged in His reception in Jerusalem during the Triumphal Entry as the King in fulfillment of prophecy (Mt. 21:1-17; Mk. 1:1-11; Lk. 19:28-48); and during His trial and execution (Mt. 27:11-14, 26-29, 37-43; Mk. 15:1-5, 9-13, 15-18, 26-32; Lk. 23:1-3, 36-43; Jn. 18:33-39; 19:1-3, 19-22).

Four Answers to Possible Objections to the Affirmation of the Inauguration of the Davidic Covenant at the Ascension of the Lord Jesus Christ:

1.  The prophesied Davidic reign in fulfillment of the Davidic Covenant must not be viewed as merely involving a reign over Israel, but a truly universal reign.  This reign is understood in the prophetic literature of the Old Testament in explicitly universal terms.

2.  That this universal Davidic reign would be initiated in and administered from heaven during the initial phase of its implementation should not be seen as inherently inconsistent with the terms of the Davidic Covenant.

3.  It must not be imagined that Christ must sit on the exact same literal throne that David sat on in order to fulfill the terms of the Davidic Covenant.  Where ever David’s ascended son/Lord is seated necessarily becomes the Davidic throne by virtue of the One seated upon it.

4.  It must not be supposed that Christ must be physically located in Israel in His humanity in order to begin fulfilling the requirements promised in the Davidic Covenant.

5.  While the actual restoration of the kingdom to Israel (Acts 1:6-8) awaits the time of their national reingrafting (Rom. 11:11-32), and regeneration (Ezek. 36:23-37:14), the stage has been set for that event in the enthronement of their King, and in His ongoing chastening of them including provoking them to jealousy through the Gentiles (Rom. 11:11-14).

Sola Scriptura, Soli Deo Gloria,

John T. “Jack” Jeffery

Pastor, Wayside Gospel Chapel

Greentown, PA

12 July 2013

The Inauguration of the Davidic Covenant at the Ascension of the Lord Jesus Christ

by John T. Jeffery

Copyright 2013 by John T. Jeffery.

All rights reserved.

The use of excerpts or reproduction of this material is prohibited

without written permission from the author.

Contact the author at:

722 South Main Ave.

Scranton, PA 18504

Home phone:  (570) 342-5787

Email:  johntjeff@verizon.net

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S. Lewis Johnson App

There is now a S.Lewis Johnson app available for iPhone and Android.  It’s just been released and is sort of in demo phase right now. But I’ve been told that the goal is to make all of the SLJ content available via the app.

Francis Schaeffer at International Congress of World Evangelism, Lausanne, Switzerland, July 1974 from francisschaefferstudies.org on Vimeo.

(HT: Jordan J. Ballor)

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I recently discovered a great number of lectures by Francis Schaeffer.  Evidently these are the “L’Abri tapes” that I first saw mentioned in True Spirituality.

I haven’t listened to very many of these yet, but this includes lectures that appear to be the basis of several of his books. These include True Spirituality, No Little People, Joshua and the Flow of Biblical History, Genesis and Science, A Christian Manifesto, The Mark of the Christian and The Finished Work of Christ, among others. I must confess that I am less familiar with his well known apologetical works than I am with some of his others but I’m sure much of that material is there in embryonic form as well.

Overall, a wide variety of topics are covered, from cultural analysis, theology in general (including a series on the Westminster Confession of Faith), apologetics, the arts, etc.  There are also a good many lectures on eschatology, including an exposition of the book of Revelation.  It is well known that Schaeffer was premillennial, which was not uncommon among Presbyterians of his day, particularly among those of his background.  The titles of some of them seem to indicate that he was pretribulational as well.  But those lectures appear to be from the early 1960’s so I don’t know if he ever changed his views as did some others like James Montgomery Boice, for example.  I haven’t read that much of Schaeffer’s work, but I hope to remedy that soon.  However, I have noticed allusions to a future for Israel in some of his writings that were published in the 1970’s.  I do think it’s interesting that a leader who was known for teachings on cultural and other issues would have taught so much on prophetical themes. But most if not all of those lectures were from the early 1960’s, prior to him becoming a popular evangelical leader in the United States and beyond.

There is also a large amount of video material available online as well, perhaps most notably the film version of How Should We Then Live?

With regard to prophetic sensationalism among premillennialists, Dr. Robert Duncan Culver (not strictly a dispensationalist, but an ardent premillennialist nonetheless) relates the following:

Unfortunately, the most grievous wounds to millennial faith have been inflicted by overzealous and sensationalist advocates among writers and preachers. As the good prophet in Zechariah 13 explains, his trauma is from “wounds . . . with which I was wounded in the house of my friends.” This has been going on as long as I have been alive [1916-  ed. note] and continues unabated. These well meaning, and I think incautious people, make the millennium vehicle for far more doctrinal freight than the biblical undercarriage was engineered to carry. Some recent “evangelical” fiction has carried this to grievous extremes in my opinion. These self-inflicted wounds by premillenarians may explain, in part at least, why presently literal interpretation of biblical predictions of a future reign of Christ on earth has been under severe attack from many quarters. As a matter of personal observation these excesses have certainly caused some to renounce chiliastic teachings and prevented others from accepting them.

Robert Duncan Culver, The Earthly Reign of Our Lord With His People, p. 7 (Third revised edition of Daniel and the Latter Days.)

In a recent post I noted the influence of Oneness Pentecostalism at Louisiana College in the recent past (if not the present.)

Until earlier this year I haven’t kept regular tabs on LC other than hearing things here and there.  For several years I had been troubled by what I noted in the second half of my last post but until now I had nothing else specific to go on.  However former LC faculty member of the year, Dr. Scott Culpepper, has now weighed in on the issue of the former Louisiana College instructor who was active in a Oneness Pentecostal ministry while employed by LC.  More importantly, he has also chronicled, in some detail, the “charismatic takeover” of the administration of Louisiana College.  These are facts that I trust most Louisiana Baptists as well as many of the members of the Board of Trustees will perhaps be unfamiliar with and will be uncomfortable with.  I have posted excerpts from Dr. Culpepper’s post below:

I am somewhat perplexed about why people seem so up in arms about an alleged Reformed takeover of Louisiana College that is not happening while they fail to recognize that a Charismatic takeover of the administration of Louisiana College happened long ago. During my time as a faculty member at Louisiana College, I witnessed official administrative endorsement of practices that were clearly charismatic in nature and which most Louisiana Baptists would find objectionable. In fact, I was often uncomfortable as someone from a Baptist background teaching at a Baptist school because much of the spirituality at the top was decidedly not Baptist.

Joe Aguillard often invited a charismatic faith healer named Delores Winder to campus to “prophesy” over the football team and share her spiritual insight with members of the administration. One Vice-President, who had a Native American heritage, told me that Winder commanded her to get rid of some turquoise earrings that were family heirlooms because their Native American origins made her vulnerable to demonic oppression. When Winder arrived on campus, devotees would flock to her side as if Moses had just descended from Sinai. Aguillard kept these meetings quiet because he was very aware that Louisiana Baptists would not approve. Impressionable young football players who had little knowledge of Christianity often got their earliest exposure in the context of these meetings. It should be noted that Louisiana College, like all Southern Baptist schools, firmly insists that faculty sign a statement indicating that they will not promote women taking leadership roles in ministry or “exercising authority over a man.” Mrs. Winder’s pronouncements were almost given the weight of scriptural revelation and there were certainly many men among her devotees.

Delores Winder was not the only “prophet” to dubiously grace the Louisiana College campus. Joe Aguillard employed a personal assistant named Joseph Cole who later departed under a cloud and with an outrageous final payoff. During a chapel service, worship leader Fred Guilbert paused to say openly before the entire student body, “Joseph (Cole) has received a prophecy that God is going to shower abundance down upon our college!” There were often whispers that administrators believed that Cole was endowed with prophetic gifts. He was definitely endowed with an amazing level of power considering that he had no previous experience and no undergraduate degree. Football coach Dennis Dunn joined the pantheon of prophets when he predicted with great confidence at the opening of the new football field in 2008 that the football team would win the conference championship that year as a means of evangelism. This pivotal evangelistic event has yet to happen. Dunn came to Louisiana College from Evangel Christian Academy in Shreveport, a school with ties to the Duron families’ Shreveport Community Church, which was formerly known as First Assembly of God. Dunn recently replaced Dr. Chuck Quarles, Dean of the Caskey Divinity School, as a chapel speaker this spring. It seems Dunn looked like a safer bet for the administration than Dr. Quarles.

Joe seems newly troubled about the Reformed people serving in the Christian Studies department, but he was blissfully content with a former professor serving as an associate pastor at a local church that embraces a Oneness theology. Oneness Theology is particularly prevalent among some Pentecostal groups. It is an anti-trinitarian theology that rejects the equality of the Son and Spirit with God the Father, resembling the heresies of Docetism and Modalism that troubled the Christian church in the second and third centuries. So accordingly, Kevin McFadden and Ryan Lister are a deadly threat, but anti-trinitarians are our new friends.

I have no issue with persons who observe their charismatic beliefs scripturally and responsibly.  Nor do I have a problem with students and faculty embracing those beliefs at a school like Louisiana College as long as those practices do not conflict with the theological commitments faculty made when they came to Louisiana College.  However, we should all have a problem with an administration at a Baptist school actively promoting practices that are at best on the fringes of Baptist life and even marginalizing those who do not agree with them.  We should all have a problem when that same administration begins to persecute Reformed Christians, who like it or not have been historically in the mainstream of Baptist life, while actively supporting practices that have dubious scriptural support and which have never been part of the mainstream of Baptist life.

Read the rest here.